Part III

Part IV

Part V

1/18/2016: 

Sol 13: Hola y buenos dias, lectores! Sure, I had to look up how to say 'readers' but 80% of the words in that sentence were brought to you directly from my burgeoning understanding of the Spanish language. Thanks DuoLingo! (Free)

Angelica and I are, as promised, in Taganga, Colombia. A tiny little beach town filled to overflowing with gringos and traveling Colombians alike. During the day, the football field-sized beach is seemingly standing room only. At night, the downtown bars and cliffside rooftop clubs all bump until the morning hours, their "more speakers means more fun" approach fills every street with a musically grey hum. 

Known for being the cheapest place on our planet to get your open water dive certification, (<$200) Taganga offers way more than the eight dirt roads and one paved that make up town would have you believe. With some great restaurants, (Babaganoush and Cafe Bonsai top my list) world-class diving, a nearby national park, relatively safe atmosphere, and our favorite hostel experience so far, Taganga won me over. I especially enjoyed doing almost nothing and swinging in a rooftop hammock while watching the sun take its full course every day. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

We stayed at a place called Magic House ($23 a night) and for the most part we were the only ones there. The woman who checked us in, we found out later, was a friend of the owner who happened to be out of town that day. The computer wasn't working and we had made our reservation only two hours before so we weren't in the book. With our lack of Spanish communication skills and this being her first day on the job, she just gave us the key and hand-waved us toward our room. We both agreed (without realizing it) to figure it out later.
 

Sol 13: Hola y buenos dias, lectores! Sure, I had to look up how to say 'readers' but 80% of the words in that sentence were brought to you directly from my burgeoning understanding of the Spanish language. Thanks DuoLingo! (Free)

Angelica and I are, as promised, in Taganga, Colombia. A tiny little beach town filled to overflowing with gringos and traveling Colombians alike. During the day, the football field-sized beach is seemingly standing room only. At night, the downtown bars and cliffside rooftop clubs all bump until the morning hours, their "more speakers means more fun" approach fills every street with a musically grey hum. 

Known for being the cheapest place on our planet to get your open water dive certification, (<$200) Taganga offers way more than the eight dirt roads and one paved that make up town would have you believe. With some great restaurants, (Babaganoush and Cafe Bonsai top my list) world-class diving, a nearby national park, relatively safe atmosphere, and our favorite hostel experience so far, Taganga won me over. I especially enjoyed doing almost nothing and swinging in a rooftop hammock while watching the sun take its full course every day. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

We stayed at a place called Magic House ($23 a night) and for the most part we were the only ones there. The woman who checked us in, we found out later, was a friend of the owner who happened to be out of town that day. The computer wasn't working and we had made our reservation only two hours before so we weren't in the book. With our lack of Spanish communication skills and this being her first day on the job, she just gave us the key and hand-waved us toward our room. We both agreed (without realizing it) to figure it out later.
 

The center of the complex that included the living room, dining room, and kitchen areas was open air, our room had air conditioning, and up a flight of stairs was a rooftop lounge area with three hammocks, two comfortable chairs, and an open patio area with enough space for at least four yoga-ers. When we finally met the owners later that night they were very nice but spoke a little less English than we did Spanish. They had been renovating the whole place and the project was in the final stages. The hostel seemed to double as their personal zoo, they had two dogs, (which they called Perucha so of course now I call every dog Perucha) a beautiful cat who demands exactly two belly rubs, any more or any less and expect to be bitten, and a baby monkey that stayed on the owner woman's shoulder at all times.

In the morning, the owner made the best arepas I've had and probably will ever have. An arepa is a flat

pancake-like disc made from ground maize dough. Sort of like a corn latke. She paired the arepa with eggs, papaya, and Colombian coffee.

 

Our Taganga routine consisted of waking up for breakfast, hanging out in the hammocks catching up on news and DuoLingo until about two, walking four blocks into town and grabbing lunch, watching the swirling mass of humans on the beach for fifteen minutes, retreating back to our hammocks for some reading, DuoLingo and an amazing sunset, heading back out for dinner, walking the main street until our ear drums begged for mercy, and finally returning to the tranquility of Magic House for more reading or occasionally to listen in on the live native ritual music from up the street. There are worse ways to spend the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will say though, the bathroom situation in Colombia is a bit jacked up. The first thing you're told right off the bat is to never flush toilet paper. There's a little covered trashcan by every toilet for the paper. I've heard in Brazil the trashcan is neither little nor covered. Next, you'll notice the showers only have one knob. This knob, I assure you, is not for temperature. No, the only purpose for this knob is to control the velocity at which the water comes out of the shower head. As for the temperature, well, you get whatever is coming next out of the barrel on the roof. Most times this means you get a nice cool shower to spell you from the intense heat and sweat. Sometimes this means you pantomime a scream as the liquid form of H2O somehow streams down on you at below freezing temperatures. And on those rare moments you're brave enough to stand under the shower head ready for any frigid blast, Colombia flips the script on you and scalding water spews forth onto your melting bare skin. So it goes...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taganga is a wonderful place that can go at whatever speed you'd like to enjoy it. Our hostel was far enough away to not hear the booming nighttime music but close enough to see the beach sunsets. We enjoyed all four days we spent here and so far its my favorite place we've been. I learned how to say, "Your arepas are the best in the world" in Spanish so I could properly describe my enthusiasm to the owner. I also discovered an apple-flavored soft drink, Manzana Postobon, I suspect I'll taste many more times before we leave the country.
 

So What’s Next?


We're headed to Minca to stay in a treehouse for two nights and then the open air hammocks of Tayrona National Park for three nights. Until next time...

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